Opinion

Double standards are at a high in hip hop music

Double standards are everywhere you look; however, in the hip-hop industry, the standards between men and women are at an all-time high.

When “WAP” by Cardi and Megan Thee Stallion came out, the world blew up in chaos.

All you heard about the song “WAP” was how sexually explicit it was and how degrading it was towards women.

Why have we not had the same energy for the new song “Throat Baby” by BRS Kash, DaBaby and City Girls?

“Throat Baby,” released earlier this year, was deemed a “lewd viral anthem” and “a melodic ode to sexual desire” by GQ.

The kicker is that they followed this statement up by defending BRS Kash, saying that this song shows his “sensitive side.”

Why, though? Is it because the song is not nearly as upbeat as “WAP”? Here lies a double standard.

BRS Kash explains his song’s background originated from a “crazy experience” he had with a girl he was intimately involved with.

He had written part of the lyrics after a night of hooking up.

The next day, he sent the partial lyrics off to the girl from the previous night and, with only a reply from her friend not the girl herself, he was able to finish off the song.

“Throat Baby,” amongst other songs on BRS Kash’s freshman album, has helped his career takeoff almost instantly.

A big double standard between “WAP” and “Throat Baby” is that the former was created to empower women, regardless of the sexual nature of the song.


“WAP” is a song written by women, to empower women and their sexual nature that has been suppressed for years by the patriarchy.

“Throat Baby” was created as an ode to the sexual desire of women, enabling men to think that women want them sexually at all times of the day, wherever they may be.

There are even innuendos of not having to receive consent from their sexual partner, which is far from OK, especially when the topic of consent is prominent.

Furthermore, to get the stamp of approval from women, BRS Kash got City Girls, a notorious female rapper group, to come on to the remix of “Throat Baby.”

With the inherent sexual explicitness of “Throat Baby,” it is no surprise that this song did not receive as much heat as “WAP” did. Why, you ask?

Society deems women who are sexually explicit as inappropriate and thinks that children should not look up to these women as role models.

However, why do we not hold the same standard for men who act the same way, if not worse?

In society today, women are held to a different standard in comparison to men. Women are assumed to be nurturing and hospitable to others.

However, women have inherent sexual natures, just like men do. It is unfair to women if we are not allowed to be our true selves.

I ask you to not demonize women for what they say and do when it’s the same thing that earns men praise.

Women are finally finding their voices in today’s society and can speak their truth.

Why would we want to silence women after so many years of not listening to them?

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